MET Helmets Corso and Grancorso review

Introduzione

And now, let’s talk about helmets; in the plural, because we will test a couple of them, both proposed by Met Helmets in the urban range: the Corso and the Grancorso.

Similar and different at the same time, the family air in common and some details, but nothing more. One of them, the Corso (the white one in the picture) is a typical urban helmet both for its shape and its technical solutions; the other one, the Grancorso (the black one in the picture) is also a typical urban helmet, but with a plus: it is optimized, studied, tested and certified for e-bikes or pedal assisted bikes, as you prefer to call them. And it received the NTA 8776 homologation: we will read later about it.

A difference that is only seemingly marginal or that is felt in everyday use? We will find out together.

But you know, I do prefer moving my bikes only by my legs’ strength (strength? Oh well…) and for this reason I chose to test the Met Helmets Grancorso moving on my legs. Of course, I did a test with a borrowed e-bike, also because it was useful to understand the optional accessories provided for this helmet. But mostly I pedaled with my legs.

And what’s the use, since it’s a helmet optimized for e-bikes? It was useful, because optimized does not mean it’s an exclusive prerogative of motorized bikes (it’s an electric one, but still it’s a motor), and it was worth to understand if and how it would prove effective in a non-electrifying use:-D

And now I should keep you busy with my usual lecture on the importance of the helmet; I could remind you that the greatest number of accidents occurs in the city, according to the statistics; I could take advantage of the privileged position of being on this side of the screen and be ironic about those fools who still repeat that the helmet is useless until buying some mayonnaise will not become an Olympic sport (because it makes you such an urban rebel and you show you’re a follower of the overseas blogs) ; I could tell you how one Met Helmet, the Manta one that I reviewed in this blog, last summer saved me in an accident where, among other things, I gave a strong blow with the nape and, even if it was a sports cycling, it was a criminal who knocked me down on a practically urban stretch of road; I could do it, but I’m not going to do it.

Because I don’t want to bore you with something you already know, and a long way is waiting for us in discovering these two helmets, so I will have to force myself to control my words.

Last note before entering into the review. These are not the first helmets proposed by Met Helmets to be presented on this blog. I already tested two of them and I will soon publish the test of the new 3k Carbon, top of the sports range of the Company and it is keeping me company while I write these notes. As I wrote in the denim Vaude Larvik test, everything started from those trousers, setting out the sequence of tests dedicated to the urban cycling. It was natural for me to turn to the always available Ulysse, the Company’s PR, to ask him for an urban helmet to be included in the work program. And he, despite the aftermath of a bad accident and a long convalescence, immediately accepted it, adding a second helmet while knowing I don’t deal with assisted pedal bikes. So I thank Ulysse, who is a passionate cyclist above all, and not because I have to: I am one of the old school, and for me it’s a pleasure when I meet an interlocutor like him.

Well, we can start thoroughly meet these helmets, according to the usual division into paragraphs: let’s start from the Met Hemets Grancorso.

Sono Fabio Sergio, giornalista, avvocato e autore.
Vivo e lavoro a Napoli e ho dato vita a questo blog per condividere la passione per la bici e la sua meccanica, senza dogmi e pregiudizi: solo la ricerca delle felicità sui pedali. I pulsanti in basso ti permettono di trovarmi sui tuoi social.

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